OBSERVATIONS

One of the law enforcement techniques currently under examination by reformers, include the use of “chokes” or neck holds. These holds, common in martial arts applications and competitions for hundreds of years, are intended to briefly render a combative subject uncons...

Excited Delirium Syndrome (ExDS), or Sudden Unexpected Death in Custody (SUDIC), is a term recognized by the National Association of Medical Examiners and defined as, “the sudden death of an individual, during or following an episode of excited delirium, in which an au...

Typically, the pre-service training of law enforcement officers involves hours of arrest-control repetitions practiced on fellow trainees involving twist-locks, joint manipulations, and takedowns. Trainees are required to demonstrate proficiency in each technique to su...

Though their use remains controversial and may actually produce negative effects on law enforcement officers, body worn cameras (BWC) are still considered and used by many law enforcement agencies in the United States (Adams, 2018). There are multiple BWC models availa...

The Force Science Institute (FSI) referenced a scientific study published in the journal, “Medicine, Science, and the Law,” examining arrest-related deaths attributed to “compression asphyxia” and associated with a subject’s inability to breathe from law enforcement of...

Some law enforcement uses of force are analyzed, critiqued, and evaluated for reasonableness by civilians with an incomplete understanding of the sympathetic nervous system (“fight or flight”), the human fear response, defensive tactics, and close quarter gunfighting.

S...

Dreaded in the game of golf, “the yips” is defined by a sudden, unexpected spasmodic jerk of the hand or forearm muscles. In golfing, the yips may manifest during a player’s putting game. Also noted in other sports, some well-known and experienced athletes have also un...

In a study currently pending peer review, researchers surveyed 93 participants to measure their baseline cynicism or “mistrust and lack of confidence” of physicians, professors, attorneys, and police. 92% of the test subjects were less than 25 years of age, 71% were fe...

Some law enforcement uses of force are associated with a term known as a "mistake of fact (MOF)." The MOF may occur when a law enforcement officer misunderstands some fact or misidentifies an object. A MOF may include an unarmed subject, a toy/replica weapon, or other...

Law enforcement officers have used force against vehicles and subjects that were perceived as still moving and/or threatening, though in actuality, the subjects may have stopped or paused. How and why does this human perception occur?

“Persistence” is a term used to ref...

Please reload

QUADRANT OPERATIONS, LLC

  • Facebook Clean Grey
  • Twitter Clean Grey
  • LinkedIn Clean Grey